School of Medicine Nephropathology Laboratory: Chemical Hygiene Plan

Title

School of Medicine Nephropathology Laboratory: Chemical Hygiene Plan

I. Purpose

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-Chapel Hill) Nephropathology Laboratory is committed to ensuring that laboratory employees are provided a safe working environment free from unnecessary hazards. All laboratory employees have a right to know about health hazards present in their work-place in order to make safe, knowledge-able decisions about any personal risks associated with their daily work activities. It is important that both the employer and employee assume responsibility for laboratory safety.

This Chemical Hygiene Plan was created to consolidate elements of both chemical hygiene plans established by the UNC-Chapel Hill Environment, Health and Safety Office and McLendon Clinical Laboratories Quality Management Safety Team. This plan includes information specific to the UNC-Chapel Hill Nephropathology Laboratory and will supplement the following three safety manuals:

  1. UNC-Chapel Hill Laboratory Safety Manual;
  2. UNC-Chapel Hill Health and Safety Manual; and
  3. McLendon Clinical Laboratories Safety Manual.

Because the clinical section of the laboratory shares a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) laboratory registration certificate with McLendon Clinical Laboratories, the clinical testing section of the laboratory must work with the McLendon Clinical Laboratories Quality Management (QM) Safety Team members to meet specific safety standards required by the College of American Pathologists (CAP) and the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO). In addition, the employees performing clinical testing must follow safety policies and procedures established by the UNC-Chapel Hill Environment, Health and Safety Office.

The information that follows will include general laboratory safety guidelines, safe chemical hygiene practices specific to chemical use in the laboratory, and references to specific policies and procedures addressed by McLendon Clinical Laboratories and the UNC-Chapel Hill Environment, Health and Safety Office. All UNC-Chapel Hill Nephropathology Laboratory employees should be familiar with this chemical hygiene plan and safety information addressed in the safety manuals above, regardless of job assignment (clinical or research).

II. Standard Operating Procedures

A. General Chemical Safety Rules

  1. Understand the hazards associated with chemicals prior to using them and take appropriate precautions. Safety manuals are available for reference on the shelf in room 412.
  2. Since many chemicals have not been studied extensively for their hazard potential, handle all chemicals in a safe manner by following these safe handling guidelines:
    1. Wear appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE).
    2. Avoid contact with eyes, skin and clothing.
    3. Do not inhale dust, mist, fumes, vapors, or gases.
    4. Wash hands thoroughly after handling.
    5. Perform work in areas with adequate ventilation or inside a chemical fume hood (certain highly toxic or carcinogenic chemicals require the use of a chemical fume hood).
    6. Avoid prolonged or repeated exposure.
    7. Keep all chemical containers tightly closed.
    8. Be familiar with each safety data sheet (SDS). These are located in red binders in room 408 or online.
  3. All volatile, toxic, corrosive, and caustic reagent preparation should be performed under a chemical fume hood using appropriate PPE (gloves and eye protection). Always add acids to water and bases to water. NEVER ADD WATER TO ACIDS OR BASES.
  4. Secondary containers or rubber bottle carriers should be used when transporting chemicals in containers greater than 500ml.
  5. A lab coat should be worn while working in the laboratory.
  6. Place broken (non-biohazard) glassware in a cardboard glass disposal box.
  7. Sharps such as needles, razor blades, cryostat blades, and slides should be placed in biohazard sharps containers. Metal containers labeled for sharps disposal may be used if the sharps are considered to be a non-biohazard.
  8. Smoking, eating, drinking, application of cosmetics and lip balm, manipulation of contact lenses, and mouth pipetting in all technical work areas, including the lab area of 404, 406, 408, and 412, is prohibited.
  9. No food or beverages are to be stored in technical refrigerators. A refrigerator located in office area of 404 and 409 has been designated as a food storage refrigerator and should not have any chemicals or biohazards stored inside it.
  10. Keep flammables away from heat sources and open flame.
  11. Dispose of gloves after handling chemicals; do not wear contaminated gloves outside of the laboratory or when handling telephone receivers, doorknobs, etc. Wash hands well after removing gloves.
  12. Keep work areas clean and free of clutter. Work areas should be cleaned regularly with a 1:10 dilution of bleach to water or Metriguard.

B. Explanation of Chemical Hazards

Hazardous chemicals fall into the following groups:

  1. Corrosive or Caustic: Acids of pH <2.0 and bases (caustics) of pH >12.5 may cause burns to the skin, mouth, or eyes and may also cause damage to equipment and storage areas. Hydrochloric acid, sulfuric acid, sodium hydroxide are caustic or corrosive in nature.

    Storage: Acids should be stored away from bases in the designated storage cabinets below the chemical fume hoods. Use them no higher than countertop level to minimize the risk of facial and upper body burns in the event of spillage. Organic acids such as acetic acid must be stored away from oxidizers such as sulfuric or nitric acid, in order to prevent formation of fumes and corrosion of storage cabinets.
  2. Highly Toxic Chemicals and Carcinogens: Almost any substance in quantity can be harmful. Highly toxic chemicals are those, which may cause death or serious side effects if relatively small amounts are inhaled, ingested, or contact the skin. Substances are designated as cancer-causing agents by the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) or International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). These chemicals require special handling, which is explained further in Chapter 7 of the UNC-Chapel Hill Laboratory Safety Manual and section VI.E of the McLendon Clinical Laboratories Chemical Hygiene Plan. Highly toxic chemicals and carcinogens may be found in the form of a gas, liquid, or solid.

    Storage: Highly toxic chemicals and carcinogens must be stored in a closed cabinet away from heat and electrical switches. Those with flammable characteristics should be stored in the flammable storage cabinet below the chemical fume hood in a secondary container. Chemicals requiring refrigeration should also be stored in a secondary container on an inside shelf, not in the door of the refrigerator.
  3. Flammables and Combustible Liquids: These are materials that easily ignite, burn, and serve as fuel for a fire. Methanol, ethanol, and acetone are examples of flammable liquids used in the laboratory.

    Storage: All containers one (1) gallon or larger must be stored in a flammable storage cabinet located below the chemical fume hoods. Flammables must be kept from strong oxidizers, any source of heat, and away from electrical switches. Refrigerated storage of flammables must be kept in a refrigerator certified for flammable material storage.
  4. Reactive Substances: Reactive substances are considered unstable at normal temperature and pressure, and can release explosive or toxic vapors. Azides, sulfuric acid, and 30% hydrogen peroxide are considered reactive substances.

    Storage: Organic acids such as glacial acetic acid must be stored in a flammable storage cabinet away from strong oxidizers. Sodium azide should be kept from strong acids and heavy metals, and stored in the flammable storage cabinet.

C. Safe Handling of Carcinogens and Other Highly Toxic Chemicals

  1. Extra care should be taken while working with these chemicals. Always wear a lab coat, protective gloves, and eye/face protection.
  2. Work inside a chemical fume hood when pipetting or transferring carcinogens and other highly toxic chemicals. Those in dry or powder form should be transferred and weighed inside a chemical fume hood while wearing a face mask. A balance cover is located below the chemical fume hood and can be placed over the balance to minimize air currents while weighing.
  3. Wash contaminated glassware and work surfaces immediately after use to prevent exposure.

D. Signs and Symptoms of Exposure and Associated First Aid

Specific signs and symptoms of exposure are listed on the SDS for each chemical.

  1. Corrosive or Caustic Chemicals: Contact with the skin will cause burning with the severity dependent on whether the chemical is in liquid or dry form. A more severe burn will result with a chemical in dry form as the solubility with skin moisture and duration of contact with the chemical increases.

    First Aid: Immediately flood the skin with water. If the chemical has contacted a large area of the body, immediately go to the shower located in the hallway near stair #2, stand under the shower, and pull the ring to flood the exposed area. Remove and discard the clothing, including socks and shoes and continue to flood the skin for a full 15 minutes. DO NOT apply sodium bicarbonate, oils, salves, or fats to the burned area unless recommended by a physician. In the event of contact with the eyes, immediately flush the eyes with water using an emergency eyewash located next to each sink in rooms 406, 408, 409, and 412, or in the hallway near stair #2. Place the face over the sink, squeeze the handle and force the eyelids open while flushing the eyes for an entire 15 minutes. (The eyewash in the hallway will require pushing the handle forward to engage the stream of water.) Flushing the eyes may be done more easily with assistance from a co-worker.
  2. Flammable Solvents: Flammable solvents such as methanol, xylene, and acetone are easily absorbed through the skin. Their fumes may result in symptoms involving the respiratory system, headaches, and narcosis. It is very important to work with these chemicals inside a chemical fume hood.

    First Aid: Upon contact with eyes or skin immediately flush with water as described above under Corrosives and Caustic Chemicals. If an exposure to the chemical fumes is suspected, immediately remove yourself from the area containing the chemical to an area of fresh air. Consult the precautionary label on the product or the SDS for specific first aid information.
  3. Highly Toxic Chemicals and Carcinogens: Generally carcinogens will cause no immediate symptoms unless they are associated with additional hazards. Routes of exposure are most often through skin absorption, inhalation, or ingestion. Depending upon the route of exposure acute symptoms may result in nausea, vomiting, headache, or difficulty breathing.

    First Aid: Upon contact with eyes or skin immediately flush with water as described above under Corrosives and Caustic Chemicals. Consult the precautionary label on the product or SDS sheet for specific first aid information.

E. Chemical Toxicity

Any new chemical used in the clinic is evaluated on its carcinogenic potential, reproductive toxicity, and acute toxicity. A Chemical Toxicity worksheet containing all of the chemicals that are of concern is maintained.

F. Chemicals Used in Nephropathology of Special Concern

  1. Glacial Acetic Acid
  2. Isopentane
  3. Xylenes
  4. Alcohol
  5. Bouin’s solution
  6. Silver nitrate
  7. Formalin
  8. Hydrochloric Acid
  9. Osmium
  10. Propylene Oxide
  11. DDSA
  12. DMP-30
  13. Poly/Bed B12
  14. Nadic Methyl Anhydride
  15. Methenamine
  16. Boric Acid
  17. Sodium Borate

G. Fire Blanket/Fire Extinguishers

A fire blanket is located on the wall outside room 412 and fire extinguishers are located next to the light switch in rooms 406, 408, and 412. Refer to Chapter 8 of the UNC-Chapel Hill Laboratory Safety Manual for further information on fire safety.

H. First Aid Kit

A first aid kit is available in room 409 and 412 for emergency treatment. The procedure IX. Incidents, Accidents and Laboratory First Aid in the McLendon Clinical Laboratories Safety Manual is a good reference for laboratory first aid practice.

I. Reporting Incidents/Accidents and Seeking Medical Follow Up

  1. All incidents and accidents should be reported to the supervisor regardless of the seriousness of the incident. Completion of the appropriate incident report form is necessary for proper follow up.
  2. Upon occurrence of an injury, the employee should immediately administer necessary first aid and go to the following health service departments for medical follow up:
  3. Depending upon the seriousness of the injury or illness the employee may be escorted directly to the Emergency Department or in cases of true emergency (e.g., cardiac arrest, uncontrolled bleeding) 911 should be called.
  4. After normal business hours (e.g., nights, weekends, holidays) University employees should call HealthLink at 919-966-7890 for treatment advice. Hospital employees should report directly to the Emergency Department if OHS is not open and University students will do the same if Campus Health is closed.
  5. Refer to Chapter 1 of the UNC-Chapel Hill Laboratory Safety Manual or Procedure IX.A. Incidents, Accidents, and Laboratory First Aid in the McLendon Clinical Laboratories Safety Manual for further information on handling incidents and accidents in the laboratory.

J. Hazard Assessment and Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), Including Task Specificity

  1. Eye and Face Protection
    1. A full visor and safety glasses/goggles must be worn when:
      • Using concentrated acids >6N.
      • Using bases >2N.
      • Transferring liquid nitrogen.
    2. Safety goggles with or without a full face visor must be worn when:
      • Using acids 1N to 6N.
      • Using bases 1N to 2N.
      • Using flammable solvents.
      • Heating test tubes or flasks.
    3. UV (Ultraviolet) approved safety glasses must be used if it is necessary to view unshielded UV lamps. A pair is located on the shelf above the microscopes in room 405.
    4. Contact lenses do not provide eye protection against chemical or UV light exposure.
  2. Gloves
    1. Protective gloves must be worn while:
      • Working with hazardous chemicals.
      • Handling specimens and specimen containers.
      • Cleaning laboratory equipment and washing glassware.
      • Working in or with subzero cold sources.
      • Using heat sources.
    2. A glove chart is available for reference in Appendix 5-A of the UNC-CH Laboratory Safety Manual and is also attached to the side of the chemical fume hood in room 412. Gloves appropriate for anticipated chemical exposure must be chosen before beginning certain work tasks and while using hazardous chemicals.
    3. Nitrile gloves are available to all employees as an alternative to latex gloves. Nitrile gloves should also be used while working with formaldehyde since latex gloves do not provide adequate protection.
    4. Insulated, fluid-resistant gloves are available for use while working with liquid nitrogen and dry ice, or while handling ultra-cold freezer specimens (-70C). The same gloves may be used while handling hot items.
  3. Lab Coats and Rubber Aprons
    1. Lab coats should be worn when working in technical areas and are supplied by the laboratory for employee use. A laundry bag is located on the back of the door to room 412 and all dirty coats are to be placed inside the bag for laundering. Lab coats should be removed before leaving the laboratory and should never be washed at home.
    2. A rubber acid/base resistant apron should be worn when working with concentrated acids >6N and bases >2N.

Hazard Assessment & Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Use Table

Assessment Performed by: Lisa Cremeans

Date: March 2002

Including reference to: McLendon Clinical Laboratories - Hazard Assessment Table A and Appendix 2-A of the UNC-Chapel Hill Laboratory Safety Plan

The following information will affect all laboratory personnel performing tasks in the laboratory:

Hazard Assessment & Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Use Table
Laboratory Operation/Source Assessment of Hazard PPE Required/Eng. Controls
Reagent/Chemical Preparation
or Use:

Acids (>6N) or bases (>2N)
Potential for eye/skin/inhalation exposure. - Gloves (consult glove permeability charts)(specify type).
- Safety glasses with side shields or goggles.
- Full face visor or chemical fume hood with sash lowered to appropriate level to give face protection.
- Chemically resistant rubber apron over lab coats.
- >/=1 liter, heavy duty rubber gloves may be appropriate.
*** Refer to SDS prior to use.
Reagent/Chemical Preparation
or Use:

Acids (1-6N) or bases (>2N)
Potential for eye/skin exposure. - Gloves (consult glove permeability charts)(specify type).
- Chemical splash goggles/glasses.
- Chemically resistant rubber apron over lab coat.
*** Use of a chemical fume hood is preferred.
*** Refer to SDS prior to use.
Highly Toxic Chemicals, Class 1-2B Carcinogenic Chemicals,
Chemicals w/Reproductive or
Mutagenic Effects:

Refer to the chemical inventory database, section J of this
document or the SDS for
specific hazards prior to use.
Potential for eye/skin/inhalation exposure. - Appropriate gloves (double gloving recommended).
- Lab coats.
- Safety glasses or goggles.
- Use a chemical fume hood.
- When weighing or working with one of these materials in powder form, a face mask must be worn.
*** Refer to SDS prior to use.
Volatile Solvents Potential for inhalation exposure, skin exposure. - Appropriate gloves.
- Safety glasses/goggles.
- Work with large volumes (>500ml) must be performed in a chemical fume hood.
Formaldehyde Use:

VOLUMES <500ml
Potential for eye/skin/inhalation exposure. - Nitrile, neoprene, or butyl rubber gloves.
- Safety glasses/goggles.
*** Use of a chemical fume hood is preferred (a chemical fume hood is needed for >500 mls).
Handling Ultra-cold Materials:

Liquid Nitrogen, Dry Ice, Items From Ultra-cold Freezers (-70C)
Thermal damage to tissues. - Thermally resistant gloves. For liquid nitrogen gloves must be both thermally resistant and impermeable to liquids.
- Face shield with safety glasses/goggles when transferring liquified gases.
Handling Hot Items:

Various items from hot plates.
Thermal damage to tissues. - Thermally resistant gloves. For handling hot liquids, gloves should be both thermally resistant and impermeable to liquids.
Inserting glass tubes into glass stoppers and handling other sharp edged objects.

(This practice is not recommended, unless absolutely necessary.)
Cuts. - Leather gloves.
- Face shield with safety glasses is recommended.
UV light or lasers:

When changing mercury bulbs in a microscope.
Radiation burns to retina, skin. - Safety glasses rated for UV or lasers; must be used if it is necessary to view unshielded UV.
*** Manufacturer UV shields on microscopes must not be removed.
Animal Handling Allergies.
Bites.
Scratches.
- Gloves.
- Lab coats.
- Eye protection.
- Face masks/respirators.
Handling Human Serum and Tissue Exposure to bloodborne pathogens. *** Use Standard Precautions
“Universal Precautions”
- Gloves.
- Lab coats.
- Safety shield or eye/mucous membrane protection when splashing of blood or body fluids is likely.
Handling broken glass due to accidental breakage. Cuts. - Use forceps, broom, and dustpan.
- Wear gloves, but avoid using hands to pick up glass.
- Never handle contaminated broken glass with hands.
Sectioning with a Cryostat or Microtome. Cuts and possible exposure to bloodborne pathogens while sectioning unfixed tissue. *** Use Standard Precautions
“Universal Precautions”
- Gloves.
- Lab coats.
- Use protective blade cover while not in use.
- Avoid removing blade with hands, use forceps when possible.

 

K. Hygiene Practice

 

  1. Hand washing: Hands should be washed thoroughly and immediately following chemical use and removal of protective gloves. Hands should also be washed following completion of laboratory duties prior to leaving the laboratory.
  2. Shoes: Shoes with rubber or crepe soles that cover the entire foot are recommended. No open toe shoes should be worn while working in the laboratory.
  3. Hair: Hair should be worn back off the shoulders when performing laboratory procedures.

L. Chemical Fume Hoods

Chemical fume hoods are a type of engineering control used in the laboratory to provide protection from airborne contaminants generated during chemical use. Chemical fume hoods must be utilized when procedures are performed using carcinogens, acute toxins, chemicals with reproductive effects, strong acids or bases, and/or volatile solvents.

  1. The following practices should be followed when using a chemical fume hood:
    • Ensure that the exhaust blower is operational by checking that the tissue paper strip attached to the bottom of the sash is being pulled toward the inside of the hood.
    • Limit the number of items placed inside the hood to assure uninterrupted airflow inside the hood.
    • Keep the sash as low as possible, but with a minimum opening of 19 inches while performing work inside the hood.
    • Work as far towards the back of the hood as possible, with a minimum set back of six (6) inches.
  2. Handling of the following chemicals should be performed inside a chemical fume hood:
    • 2-Methylbutane (Isopentane)
    • Acetic Acid (glacial)
    • Acid Hematoxylin Solution
    • Ethidium Bromide Solution*
    • Formaldehyde/Formalin*
    • Hydrochloric Acid
    • Silver Nitrate
    • Methanol
    • Nadic Methyl Anhydride
    • Osmium
    • Paraformaldehyde*
    • Picric Acid
    • Propylene Oxide
    • Tri-Reagent*
    • Xylene*
    • Methenamine
    • Silver Nitrate
    • Boric Acid
    • Sodium Borate
    • Gold Chloride
    • Sodium Thiosulfate

      * Chemicals considered highly toxic, carcinogenic, mutagenic, or considered to cause reproductive effects.
  3. Chemical fume hoods will be inspected annually by the UNC-Chapel Hill Environment, Health and Safety Office. Records can be found in the Nephropathology Safety Manual as well as on the fume hoods themselves. This will serve as the required chemical fume hood function verification.

M. Exposure Monitoring for Formaldehyde and Xylene (see also Formaldehyde/Xylene Safety)

  1. The permissible exposure limit (PEL) for formaldehyde in the workplace is 0.75 parts formaldehyde per million parts of air (0.75 ppm) measured as an 8-hour time-weighted average (TWA).
    • The standard includes a second PEL in the form of a short-term exposure limit (STEL) of 2 ppm which is the maximum exposure allowed during a 15-minute period.
    • The action level - which is the standard’s trigger for increased industrial hygiene monitoring and initiation of worker medical surveillance - is 0.5 ppm when calculated as an 8-hour TWA.
  2. OSHA Permissible exposure limit (PEL) for xylene is 100 ppm (435 milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m(3)) of air) as an 8-hour time-weighted average (TWA) concentration and 150 ppm (655 mg/m(3)) as a 15-minute TWA short-term exposure limit (STEL)
  3. The last monitoring for both Formaldehyde and Xylene was in January 2016. Since that time there has been 1) no change in production, equipment, process, or personnel or control measures that may result in new or additional exposure to formaldehyde and 2) there have been no reports if conditions that may be associated with exposure. The UNC-Chapel Hill Nephropathology Laboratory has not exceeded exposure limits.
  4. Action limits include if any personnel report signs or symptoms of respiratory or dermal conditions associated with formaldehyde exposure.

N. Centrifugation

Chemicals, reagents, and biological specimens should NEVER be centrifuged without use of caps, stoppers, or parafilm.

O. Spill Control

  1. The hazardous chemical spill kit is located in room 408 near the chemical general storage area. The spill control kit contains items used to contain and absorb spilled liquids.
  2. Replacement spill kits may be purchased through the UNC-CH Scientific Storeroom, item number SR64125.
  3. Refer to Chapter 1 of the UNC-CH Laboratory Safety Manual for response steps to chemical and mercury spills.
  4. The UNC-Chapel Hill Environment, Health and Safety Office should be called for cleanup if the spill is greater than 100ml of an OSHA regulated chemical carcinogen or a highly toxic chemical, more than 1 liter of a volatile or flammable solvent, or more than 1 liter of a corrosive (acid or base) liquid.

III. Chemical Inventory

A. Receiving Chemicals In the Laboratory

  1. All chemicals should be labeled upon receipt with the date received and any special precaution labels used to alert the user to specific hazard such as “corrosive” or “carcinogen”.
  2. When opening the chemical for the first time, the open date should be recorded on the container.

B. Reagent Labeling

  • Content and quantity, concentration or titer.
  • Storage requirements.
  • Date prepared or reconstituted by laboratory.
  • Expiration Date.

C. Chemical Inventory Database

  1. An inspection of the chemical inventory in the laboratory is performed annually in addition to keeping a chemical inventory database. The chemical database can be found online in the Lab Safety Plan on the UNC-Chapel Hill Environment, Health and Safety website. The database lists the following:
    • User (Clinical or Research)
    • Chemical name
    • Manufacturer
    • Quantity
    • Location
    • Storage information
    • Received date
    • Compatibility
    • Hazard type
    • SDS date
    • Expiration
    • Catalog number
    • Special safe handling practices

IV. Safety Data Sheets (SDS)

  1. Safety data sheets (SDS) for chemicals used in the laboratory are found in binders on the shelf in room 412. In addition, they may be obtained on-line at:
  2. Training in the use of the SDS is part of the employee’s orientation to the UNC-Chapel Hill Nephropathology Laboratory and all employees are asked to review SDS before beginning work with all chemicals for the first time.
  3. The SDS contains the following:
    • The identification of the product;
    • Physical and chemical characteristics;
    • Physical and health hazards;
    • Primary routes of exposure;
    • Permissible exposure limits (PEL);
    • Precautions;
    • Work practice controls; and
    • Emergency and first aid procedures.

V. Chemical Labeling

For more detailed information on labeling refer to labeling guidelines outlined by the UNC-Chapel Hill Laboratory Safety Manual and McLendon Clinical Laboratories Chemical Hygiene Plan.

  1. Existing labels on chemical containers should not be removed or defaced in any way.
  2. All hazardous reagents or materials prepared for research use in the laboratory must be labeled with the following information:
    • Chemical Identity - The name of the chemical must be spelled fully. No molecular formulas should be used alone. (Example - “H2SO4” must be written as “sulfuric acid.”)
    • If a buffer solution is prepared the type of buffer must be identified. (Example - “Buffer Solution - Tris.”)
    • Date prepared.
    • Chemical hazard warnings should also be noted such as “Corrosive”, “Carcinogen”, or “Flammable."
  3. All hazardous reagents or materials prepared for clinical use in the laboratory must be labeled with the following information:
    • Chemical Identity/Content (spelled fully).
    • Concentration.
    • Date of receipt or preparation.
    • Expiration date.
    • Storage requirements.
    • Exposure first aid.
  4. OSHA regulations permit chemical transfer containers to remain unlabeled only if the person dispensing and using the chemical is present at all times.

VI. Hazardous Chemical Waste Disposal

  1. Management of hazardous waste will follow the guidelines established by the UNC-CH Environment, Health and Safety Office found in Chapter 10 of the UNCH-Chapel Hill Laboratory Safety Manual. All laboratory employees should be familiar with the disposal guidelines addressed in Chapter 10.
  2. The clinical testing staff in the UNC-Chapel Hill Nephropathology Laboratory will dispose of the following hazardous chemical waste through the UNC-Chapel Hill Environment, Health and Safety Office:
    1. 0.4% Lead Citrate Waste
    2. 5.0% Uranyl Acetate Waste
    3. Formalin
  3. The clinical testing staff will also participate in the Hazardous Waste Reduction Program utilized by McLendon Clinical Laboratories. The procedure IV.C. Hazardous Waste Reduction Program is found in the McLendon Clinical Laboratories Safety Manual.

VII. Chemical Hygiene Responsibilities

The UNC-Chapel Hill Nephropathology Laboratory employees share responsibilities for laboratory safety with the principal investigator, laboratory director, laboratory supervisor, UNC-Chapel Hill Environment, Health and Safety Office, and the McLendon Clinical Laboratories Departmental Safety Coordinator and Quality Management (QM) Safety Team members.

The UNC-Chapel Hill Nephropathology Laboratory Director or designee is responsible for annual review of the effectiveness of this Chemical Hygiene Plan. In most situations, the Supervisor will act as the Chemical Hygiene Officer. The UNC-Chapel Hill Laboratory Safety Manual and the McLendon Clinical Laboratories Safety Manual will explain chemical hygiene responsibilities in greater detail.

A UNC-Chapel Hill Nephropathology Safety Meeting is held each fall where changes and pertinent parts of the chemical hygiene plan are covered. Each attending employee signs that they were in attendance and understand the material covered.

VIII. OSHA Laboratory Standard

OSHA 1910.1450, "Occupational Exposures to Hazardous Chemicals in Laboratories" (henceforth referred to as the Laboratory Standard) dictates that employers limit employees' exposure to hazardous chemicals to below the permissible exposure limit (PEL) (or action level, if applicable) for a specific chemical. This Laboratory Standard requires that employees be apprised of the hazards of chemicals present in their work area through information and training. It also requires that a written "Chemical Hygiene Plan" be developed, implemented, and made available to employees. The Laboratory Standard applies only to laboratories, and, in general, supersedes other OSHA health standards.

IX. Training

UNC-Chapel Hill Nephropathology Laboratory employees involved in laboratory activities are required to attend safety training in the area of compliance with the Laboratory Standard (OSHA) regulations. Employees are trained at the time of employment through training sessions held by the UNC-Chapel Hill Environment, Health and Safety Office and/or McLendon Clinical Laboratories. Specific training requirements and documentation of training is explained further in the UNC-Chapel Hill Nephropathology Laboratory Safety Plan.

X. Additional Components of the Laboratory Standard

The following information not previously addressed in this document is found in the UNC-Chapel Hill Laboratory Safety Manual and McLendon Clinical Laboratories Safety Manual:

  • Exposure Monitoring
    • Xylene, Formaldehyde
  • Reporting Injuries and Illnesses
  • Medical Consultations and Examinations (see Occupational Injuries and Workplace Safety)
  • Record Keeping

XI. References

  1. McLendon Clinical Laboratories Safety Team. McLendon Clinical Laboratories Safety Manual. As revised.
  2. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Environment, Health and Safety Office. Laboratory Safety Manual. As revised.
  3. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Environment, Health and Safety Office. Environment, Health and Safety Manual. As revised.

Details

Article ID: 132352
Created
Thu 4/8/21 9:29 PM
Modified
Mon 10/30/23 9:45 AM
Effective Date
If the date on which this document became/becomes enforceable differs from the Origination or Last Revision, this attribute reflects the date on which it is/was enforcable.
02/04/2021 12:00 AM
Issuing Officer
Name of the document Issuing Officer. This is the individual whose organizational authority covers the policy scope and who is primarily responsible for the policy.
Issuing Officer Title
Title of the person who is primarily responsible for issuing this policy.
Medical Laboratory Supervisor
Last Review
Date on which the most recent document review was completed.
02/01/2023 12:00 AM
Last Revised
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02/04/2021 12:00 AM
Next Review
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02/01/2024 12:00 AM
Origination
Date on which the original version of this document was first made official.
03/26/2002 12:00 AM
Responsible Unit
School, Department, or other organizational unit issuing this document.
School of Medicine - Nephropathology Laboratory